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What’s happening in the field of OEE? Where is OEE going? If you want to read about the latest developments and OEE techniques, this is the place to be. Sit back, relax and enjoy our OEE blogs and news over a cup of coffee 

What are the OEE roles?

What are the OEE roles?

In order to manage short lead-times of order fulfillment, meet cost targets, handle the pressure on budgets, and the demands to quality, the right priorities must be set. But where to start and what to do?

This blog series is about the fundamentals of OEE. We will answer the 10 most important questions around the subject of OEE and give an insight into the possibilities it offers.

10 things everybody should know about OEE
Get this comprehensive whitepaper containing the most important knowledge on Overall Equipment Effectiveness here »

Question number 3:

3. What are the OEE roles?

OEE roles of the production team

OEE Information is only useful when it is shared with fellow team members of the production team and various departments in the organization. OEE is most effective when those who actually create the value, the operators and their shop floor colleagues, are in the lead. After all, they use the machines on a day to day basis, they operate, load and maintain the machines as efficiently as possible.

The invisible becomes visible – and it might be something different than you would expect

When a machine causes problems like slow down, failure or quality problems – the operators are the people who see the most, understand what is going on and are well suited to monitor problems. OEE data can be converted into useful diagrams that show which machines or processes are causing problems and where. The data are the best starting point for improvement.

OEE roles management

When the operators are in the lead, what is management’s role regarding OEE? The production team is responsible for executing the work, and management should create such an environment that the work can be executed as efficiently and effectively as possible. It is management’s role that the production team is provided with the right system changes, so they can perform better.

In short, management:

  1. Formulates improvement targets (what is the current and the preferred situation)
  2. Implements OEE
  3. Asks the team to make losses visible and makes it possible to discuss them among all people involvement
  4. Makes improvement possible by creating ways to eliminate the losses

 

Do you want to get the whole comprehensive series on the 10 most important aspects of OEE in one whitepaper? Download the whitepaper here:

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Why is OEE important?

Why is OEE important?

In order to manage short lead-times of order fulfillment, meet cost targets, handle the pressure on budgets, and the demands to quality, the right priorities must be set. But where to start and what to do?

This blog series is about the fundamentals of OEE. We will answer the 10 most important questions around the subject of OEE and give an insight into the possibilities it offers.

10 things everybody should know about OEE
Get this comprehensive whitepaper containing the most important knowledge on Overall Equipment Effectiveness here »

Question number 2:

2. Why is OEE important?

OEE is important because it is part of improvement strategies

Calculating OEE is a crucial element of improvement strategies, including Total Productive Manufacturing (TPM) and Lean Manufacturing. By using OEE, it is revealed which machine or process needs to be improved at what point. Without OEE, many losses remain invisible. OEE, when correctly implemented, makes visible all losses on each measured machine.

TPM: A Japanese invention In 1971, the Japan Institute of Plant Maintenance, introduced the concept of Total Productive Maintenance. Eventually, TPM evolved into Total Productive Manufacturing. Around the end of the 1980s, TPM became also known in the Western world. At the end of the 1990s, the first books on OEE were published. They made OEE accessible and feasible for Western production areas. OEE was initially used in TPM to improve processes.

 

OEE is important because is measures machines, not people

When production goals are not met, it is sometimes tempting to blame the production team, the engineers or the management. One of the big advantages of using OEE is that it measures machines and processes, not people. The objective of the measurement is improvement. OEE provides a common language for production teams, operation managers and management.

For teams, it is crucial that everybody understands that the OEE measurement does not criticize people. Its sole purpose is to improve the machine and/or the process. Sharing information is important: It gives a team a common goal.

 

Do you want to get the whole comprehensive series on the 10 most important aspects of OEE in one whitepaper? Download the whitepaper here:

« Previous blog: What is OEE?  |  Next blog: What are the OEE roles? »

More about Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE)

 

 

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What is OEE?

What is OEE?

In order to manage short lead-times of order fulfillment, meet cost targets, handle the pressure on budgets, and the demands to quality, the right priorities must be set. But where to start and what to do?

Making decisions based on gut feeling is not the best option. It is much better to take action based on facts and data. How can you motivate the people who make the product, who maintain the equipment, and who plan and manage the value-creating process, to behave in a way that leads to all the above? OEE can help manufacturers to collect data that can be processed into valuable information.

This blog series is about the fundamentals of OEE. We will answer the 10 most important questions around the subject of OEE and give an insight into the possibilities it offers.

10 things everybody should know about OEE
Get this comprehensive whitepaper containing the most important knowledge on Overall Equipment Effectiveness here »

We will start to answer the first question: What is OEE?

1. The definition of OEE

OEE stands for Overall Equipment Effectiveness or Overall Equipment Efficiency. It is a measurement tool that is used to reveal production losses (or better said: improvement opportunities) of a machine. When these losses are identified, they can be solved by using improvement strategies like TPM, Six Sigma, Lean Manufacturing, or Monozukuri.

With OEE, you and your teammates can discover where (and for what issue) a machine needs attention. That way, it will become clear what incidents do not add any value – or, even worse, subtract value – and need to be resolved.

For who is OEE relevant?

OEE is a methodology for operators, mechanics, team leaders, quality staff, shop floor and production managers, and continuous improvement managers. The OEE measurement gives them the possibility to evoke and steer a strong productivity improvement.

 

Do you want to get the whole comprehensive series on the 10 most important aspects of OEE in one whitepaper? Download the whitepaper here:


Next blog: Why is OEE important? »

 

More about Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) »

 

 

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A connected and improved factory with OEE Toolkit 8

A connected and improved factory with OEE Toolkit 8

Our OEE Toolkit Suite makes it possible to analyse machine effectiveness within discrete, batch and continuous production processes. OEE Toolkit 8 will enable you to interpret your losses and start improving production effectiveness for continuous improvement – based on facts and figures.

With our new OEE Toolkit 8 you will get a high and fast acceptance from your shop floor to your management. You can involve your shop floor team as much as you want and find out how they make big discoveries every day. The decisions can be made on trusted data because this toolkit provides adequate answers for better decision making. All of the shift times will be fully accountable and the connectivity with any production line, device or application will go smoothly. The additional functionality can be implemented in the most easiest and quickest way. This toolkit will fit excellent with TPM, Six Sigma and Lean Manufacturing. The focus is completely on Continuous improvement based on reliable facts and figures.

In general, with the OEE Toolkit 8 you will get a more connected and improved factory:
• Ease of use for operators and supervisors
• Supports any factory, any production process, any equipment
• Flexible acquisition of data: automatic, semi-automatic or manual
• Accurate data collection & high-performance data crunching
• Data presented in advanced easy to read charts and reports
• Visualization on pc’s, monitors and smartphones
• Reliable data, based on validation mechanism
• Sequential time registration
• Highly configurable, expandable and scalable from 1 to 100+ lines
• Easy integration into ERP, MES, CMMS and SPC applications
• Multiple-language support
• Operational within 24 hours

Do you have questions about your manufacturing challenges, about OEE or FullFact’s OEE Toolkit Suite, Services or FullFact Fast Upgrade Track? Or would you like to show you a demo? We’re pleased to help. You can give us a call, send us an e-mail or check our website: https://fullfact.com/oee-software-entry/.

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Louis’ Logbook: Don’t fall in these two traps ! (Part 2)

Louis’ Logbook: Don’t fall in these two traps ! (Part 2)

Part 2

Danger 2 : knowledge and design of OEE implementation is assigned to only one person in the organisation

Another danger I signal, is that technical knowledge on the design and set-up of OEE Toolkit is not decentralised in the organisation. An example: master-data configuration is only known how to get it done at one person in the organisation, sometimes the product manager or system administrator. But what happens when this person changes companies? How is this knowledge spread throughout the company? You could create your own trap if you don’t diffuse the information when this person leaves. If you are lucky the successor has knowledge of OEE Toolkit, but this would rather be an exception of the rule. I would argue to diffuse knowledge on OEE Toolkit amongst multiple people, including people on the shop floor. The first operators and the middle managers ought to know how to play with information from the OEE Toolkit, so that losses could be solved in an adequate manner.

In sum, it’s important to decentralise OEE-knowledge, improvement methods and implementation design within the organisation to avoid value loss of OEE Toolkit as an improvement tool for Continuous Improvement. It’s also imperative to regard OEE Toolkit not just as a tool for the Manager but to be carried forward by the operators as well.

Refresh OEE Workshop for Operators
In case you realise that this is an issue at your company, don’t hesitate to contact us and ask for advice. An easy way to solve certain issues is to host a Refresh Workshop Operators and Supervisors on-site.

Contact: Louis.hopstaken@fullfact.com

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A smart strategy? The experiences of running a pilot with OEE software

A smart strategy? The experiences of running a pilot with OEE software

The experiences of executing a pilot using FullFact’s OEE Software

Imagine being on a quest to find the right OEE software to visualize your productivity losses. You’ve compared prices and features, you’re almost ready to make your decision, but you’re not quite 100% sure yet. There are a few “what-ifs” ringing in your head. In this situation, we recommend running a test phase before heading towards large-scale adoption. But what to expect?

 

Future Visioning of your Factory

Implementing OEE as a tool for Continuous Improvement (CI) requires a vision of the future state. To transform business processes, you need to define the business value for the OEE pilot as a part of the CI way of working. We recommend taking the time to do this properly, as it will lay the foundations, establish expectations with management, improve the efficiency of your team, eliminate process waste, and reduce the time it takes to benefit from your project.

We want to emphasize that Continuous Improvement is not a project with a beginning and an end: it is a growth and learning mindset on how to run the factory as a team. The well-known “Plan, Do, Check, Act” cycle will be repeated many times over to reach the desired improvement outcomes.

 

Initial Step: Form a Project Team

A successful pilot implementation requires an organization of business process owners, including key stakeholders such as Purchase, IT, Team Lead and Process Engineer. Together they determine the project scope, objectives, and measurements for the engagement and culture change. It’s key that all participants share the same focus areas for the project to move forward. And the involvement of IT is vital: a pilot may require infrastructure change and additional resources in time and investment.

 

What Does the Process of Implementing an OEE Pilot Look Like?

In essence, the process of a pilot implementation looks exactly the same as an implementation for 100+ lines. The only difference is the scale – here, you test on just one machine, with a limited timeframe of three months, and a focused effort in testing the OEE software. For the pilot to succeed, it’s paramount to choose a machine where success is guaranteed. FullFact will advise you how to do this. After agreeing on the pilot objectives, as well as the scope and preconditions of the project, the next steps are as follows:

 

Step 1: The Kick-Off and Plant Survey

A kick-off is planned to introduce the software system to the project team and the customer. During this meeting, we discuss the project and how we can learn from each other.

 

Step 2: Planning and Control

After the kick-off, FullFact will finalize the project plan and planning. At this point it will be made clear to both parties what needs to be done to implement the entire OEE system of FullFact, and who will be involved in the process.

 

Step 3: Workshops

Our specialized consultant will then facilitate a session in which the OEE Industry standard will be explained to the customer’s project team. Here, the consultant will work with the team to get any information needed to fill in availability, performance and quality losses before moving on to Step 4.

 

Step 4: Installation and Training

A FullFact engineer will prepare the database and configuration using the definition sheet as mentioned in Step 3. When the engineer arrives at your site, they will check that everything is in place to install the software. After the installation, there will be training on how to use the software. This is the start of data-collect.

 

Step 5: Analysis Workshop

After nine weeks, we expect the customer to have gathered enough information using the software to address their data. We’ll visit the site once more to check the data and advise on any optimization possibilities. This is also a chance to evaluate the project as a whole

If you’d like more information on how to implement OEE effectively in your factory, you can download the OEE white paper here.

Experiences From (former) Pilot Customers

Plant Manager Remy de Kuyper and Process Optimizer Jan Tjoelker at Royal Fassin confirm it: running a pilot does give you the experience you need. The main reasons for stand-stills on the line are revealed, which mean you can then set about making improvements.

“In the first couple of weeks we were already able to see the reasons for stand-stills on the line, and also which products were causing the majority of these interruptions. Furthermore, we’ve noticed a difference in output between shifts, and have gathered valuable information about the mean time between repairs. This inside information provided by OEE Toolkit has helped us to realize the first improvements for the shop floor at very short notice.” Jan Tjoelker, Process Optimizer at Royal Fassin.

“We got in touch with OEE through the ERP system we use – there’s an OEE module in there. However, we noticed a number of limitations: we wanted to be able to zoom in on the actual reasons for downtime. But the system doesn’t lend itself to that. Making analyses was very cumbersome. This is why I started looking for an OEE solution. The first step was to manually track OEE downtime with FullFact’s ManualCollect. After a few months we started working with RemoteCollect. That made a very big difference for us. Almost everything went automatically, and the measurements became so much more accurate. But that also meant our OEE is now many times lower than during the (erroneous) measurement of OEE in the ERP period. Also, the reporting possibilities are endless, they give me insight into the possibilities for improvement, although it’s not always easy to choose which report to use. I would like to develop myself in reading reports and choosing the downtime reasons that lead to an increased performance of our OEE. I’m very happy with the insights and improved performance, and I’m very hopeful for what the future will bring!” Remy de Kuyper, Plant Manager at Koninklijk de Kuyper 

 

Conclusion

For an OEE pilot to succeed, you need to start with your vision, and regard the OEE Toolkit Pilot as a way to leverage Continuous Improvement processes. It’s important to build a solid foundation with your project team, with clear objectives and assigned roles to guide the project. Then the pilot will give a realistic view of what the implementation of OEE software would be like on a larger scale. The experiences, OEE insights and improvements will help build a business case for how Overall Efficiency Effectiveness could transform your plant(s). Last but not least, the pilot will unveil hidden losses, though, of course, achieving operational excellence takes time, effort and diligence. It’s not always easy, but it’s hugely rewarding to achieve increased productivity as a team.

 

 

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New employees

New employees

FullFact is very happy to welcome two new employees! Dirk-Jan van de Wilde (left) and Max van der Heijden (right).

Dirk-Jan de Wilde

Our new employee Dirk-Jan (DJ) de Wilde started at FullFact as Software Engineering Manager in June 2019. DJ has an extensive track record of 25 years in software development and verification of complex embedded systems ranging from consumer devices to medical brain implants and X-ray scanners. He is hired to streamline Fullfact’s software development & delivery process with the goal to provide more frequent deliveries and with higher quality. Very important work because in the end it is all about making more customers happy and how can that better be achieved with relevant, up to date, top of the line quality software.

 

Max van der Heijden 

On 1 February 2019, I started as an intern at FullFact Solutions. This would be my graduation internship to finalize my training as an application developer. After I obtained my diploma, I was offered a job as Junior Software Tester at FullFact.

Working at FullFact is very enjoyable because, just as with customers, there are short lines of communication. Working on a product that is used on this scale is new to me and therefore gives me a lot of motivation.
Currently I am also studying the code of OEE Toolkit. Because I have knowledge of both testing and programming, I can identify otherwise hard to find bugs.
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New Client OEE Toolkit: Royal Fassin B.V.

New Client OEE Toolkit: Royal Fassin B.V.

Royal Fassin B.V. is a Dutch company based in ‘s-Heerenberg near the German border. The ‘royal’ signature was awarded on behalf of the Queen of the Netherlands and it represents a strong sense of long-term vision, confidence, reliability, social responsibility, and engagement. Royalty will therefore always resonate in this proud and independent family business. Royal Fassin is specialized in the production of extruded fruit gum and liquorice products (like the famous Katja™ liquorice). Modern techniques, dedicated people and the highest quality standards make that happen!

An essential tool for Continuous Improvement

The reason Royal Fassin wanted to start measuring their OEE is because they see it as an essential tool for Continuous Improvement.

We have selected the OEE Toolkit of FullFact because it is a powerful analytics tool, which constantly monitors the performance of the lines to get real-time data available for everyone involved” according to Jan Tjoelker, process optimizer within Royal Fassin. “In the first couple of weeks we were already able to see the main reasons for standstills on the line, and also which products are causing the majority of these interruptions. Furthermore, we noticed a difference in output between the several shifts and got valuable information about the mean time between repairsThis inside information provided by OEE Toolkit will help us to realise the first improvements for the shop floor on a very short notice”

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New partnership announcement

New partnership announcement

Eindhoven, Gent, November 2019.

FullFact Solutions, a leading supplier of OEE software and services, and Wojata, a niche consulting firm, announce their collaboration. Wojata, equipped with the OEE Toolkit package from FullFact, is a 24/7 “external process engineer” for small and medium-sized companies.

“An essential tool for achieving these objectives, without a doubt, is the follow-up of production with Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) analysis. This tool helps the entire organization to get a clear overview of what is happening on the production floor. At FullFact they understand the OEE thoroughly and bundled their experience and knowledge into a complete and user-friendly software package, supported by a strong support team. “We have good practical experience with this package in stimulating production goals. That is why we use the FullFact package as a tool to help companies in different industries improve their production objectives, both in terms of capacity and quality” said Bram Olaerts, director of Wojata.

“We are delighted to work with Wojata because they offer a unique value proposition to a market segment that FullFact, on their own, would never reach. This partnership forms a basis for further expanding our market presence in the Meuse-Rhine Euregion,” said Max. Marinissen, Managing Director of FullFact Solutions.

About Wojata

Wojata is a consultancy firm based in Genk (BE) that helps process and production engineers in small and medium-sized companies that do not have the right tools and techniques to improve their production goals through automated production reports and on-demand process analysis.

About FullFact

FullFact Solutions are the OEE pioneers and experts in the field of OEE software since 1995 with an office in Eindhoven (the Netherlands) and international partnerships. FullFact’s OEE Toolkit serves more than 150 customers in 38 countries and have implemented the software on over 5,000 production lines in a wide range of industries.

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Louis’ Logbook: Don’t fall in these two traps ! (Part 2)

Louis’ Logbook: Don’t fall in these two traps !

Part 1

Every week, I visit companies that use FullFacts’ OEE Toolkit over a longer period of time in their improvement programs. My assumption is that they’ve acquired the tool to leverage their continuous improvement programs such as World Class Manufacturing (WCM), Total Productivity Management (TPM) etc.

In reality, OEE Toolkit is not always used to leverage value for continuous improvement.  Especially at small to SME’s with 50 to 300 employees, I notice that OEE Toolkit is a merely a tool for Production or Quality Managers to make informed decisions, based on reports derived after a shift has been finished. Yet, having operators involved in daily management makes the difference: one enables to think as a team and come up with solutions. So, in my opinion it’s a tool for both the operators, managers as well as the board to make informed decisions and improving production lines. With just the Production or Quality Manager in charge, I see two dangers lurking around the corner.

Danger 1 : OEE-improvement process is only a managerial tool

I notice that there are often a couple of managers carrying the trajectory forward. It is often just the Product- or Quality Manager itself with some supporting staff members. Due to shortage of personnel or high pressure, reports are barely shared with the shop floor personnel – and sometimes, not even. This results in operators not feeling ownership in their Continuous Improvement efforts. In short, it stays the ‘toy’ of the manager.

In general, the operators know very well what the potential causes could be for idle machines and deliver valuable input on how to solve it. By involving the operators and giving them the right amount of responsibility, you create ownership unleashing unknown levels of potential improvement. If one would ask me for advice: have a critical look at how you can improve your daily management and follow-up on the team efforts.

 

Next time we’ll talk about danger number two… To be continued!

 

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His Majesty King Willem-Alexander opens Brainport Industries Campus (BIC) in Eindhoven

His Majesty King Willem-Alexander opens Brainport Industries Campus (BIC) in Eindhoven

FullFact part of #theBICpicture

The first Factory of the Future on Brainport Industries Campus with a size of 100,000 m2 and since last week also the home base of FullFact, was officially opened today by his Majesty King Willem-Alexander.

The day was started with a tour with Hosts Ferdinand P.M. Gremmen and Erik Veurink.

Subsequently, a film about BIC was shown on a large stage with the latest technical gadgets in the field of audio-visual aids and there were presentations from various involved such as Deputy Erik van Merrienboer, Mayor John Jorritsma and Ferdinand Gremmen. The King received his first task for the official opening here: under the watchful eye of around 1500 guests, a memorial plaque was engraved by a robot with the signature set by the King.

Then everyone went outside where King Willem-Alexander at the foot of the entrance stairs revealed a work of art by Juul Rameau, an Eindhoven artist and designer, by placing the engraved memorial plaque. With the making of a group photo ended the visit of His Majesty King Willem-Alexander.

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FullFact moved to Brainport Industries Campus on September 27th

FullFact moved to Brainport Industries Campus on September 27th

Brainport Industries Campus (BIC) in Eindhoven, with a large number of innovators with a focus on the manufacturing industry under one roof, is the new home of FullFact Solutions. FullFact has thus moved to “the epicenter of the high-tech production industry”.

“A very warm welcome to FullFact, I am convinced that there are many opportunities for all tenants due to the interaction that the BIC ecosystem offers.” Said Niels Langenhuizen, Development Manager of SDK Vastgoed.

“I believe in the concept of the campus,” says Max Marinissen, director of FullFact, the producer of OEE software that enables companies to increase the productivity of their machines. “A large number of innovative companies and programs with a focus on the production and smart industry come together here. We expect that this form of collaboration will offer a great deal of exposure and will contribute to the positioning of FullFact as a supplier of innovative solutions in the manufacturing industry. With the Summa college in the BIC, FullFact can continue to build for the future ”.

About Brainport Industries Campus
The Brainport Industries Campus is located near Eindhoven Airport, the A2 / N2 motorway and the Beatrix canal. BIC makes new collaboration models possible, boundaries between companies disappear. The ambition is to turn the campus into an international showcase that reinforces the power of the supply chain in the region. Brainport Industries Campus is a development and realization of SDK Vastgoed on behalf of VOF BIC and is a collaboration with the municipality of Eindhoven, Brainport Industries, the province of Noord-Brabant and De Brabantse Ontwikkelings Maatschappij (BOM).

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